An Evening with Claudio Caldini

October 21, 2017, 4:00 PM

The Fanny Brice Theatre, SCA 110, George Lucas Building, USC School of Cinematic Arts Complex, 900 W. 34th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90007

ZdC: Cinema & Media Studies Graduate Association at the USC School of Cinematic Arts and Los Angeles Filmforum invite you and a guest for

An Evening with Claudio Caldini

4:00 PM – 6:00 PM on Saturday, October 21st, 2017
 
Q&A Moderated by Professor David James

Featuring 8mm Screenings of:
Aspiraciones (1976) 
Vadi Samvadi (1981)
Ofrenda (1978) 
Gamelan (1981) 
La
escena circular (The Circular Scene) (1982)
S/T (2007)
And Video Presentations of:
Consecuencia (1992) 
Prisma (2005) 
Deadline (2015) 


Presented as part of First Forum 2017, "Con+tagion", the USC Cinema and Media Studies Graduate Conference, October 20–21. The event is presented in partnership with LA Filmforum as part of Ism, Ism, Ism: Experimental Cinema in Latin America.
 

About Claudio Caldini

A major force of Argentine and Latin American experimental cinema for 45 years, Claudio Caldini was an active member of the "Cine Ex" group gathered at the Goethe Institut Buenos Aires between 1974 and 1983 to promote production, screening and lecturing on experimental film. Caldini is a dedicated 8mm filmmaker, performance artist, composer and curator, and he has mentored several young 8mm artists who have gained international prominence over the past decade. His small-gauge work is remarkable for its sensuality, intimacy and precision, and he has collaborated with artists in many mediums.

Caldini’s visit to California was made possible by the Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts.

About Professor David James

David E. James is on the faculty of the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California.  He received his B.A. and M.A. degrees in English Literature from Cambridge University and an M.A. and Ph.D., also in English, from the University of Pennsylvania. He has held academic positions at the University of California, Occidental College, New York University, Korea University, Shanghai University of Science and Technology, the Beijing Film Academy, National Taiwan University, and Viet Nam National University, Hanoi. His awards include an NEH Fellowship for College Teachers, Rockefeller Foundation Fellowship in the Humanities at the Whitney Museum of American Art, an Academy Film Scholarship from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, and the Associates Award for Creativity in Research at USC; he has also been a scholar at the Getty Research Institute and a fellow at the Center for the Advanced Study of Visual Arts and the National Gallery in Washington, DC.

James is the author of Written Within and Without: A Study of Blake's Milton (Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 1977), Allegories of Cinema: American Film in the Sixties (Princeton University Press, 1989), Power Misses: Essays Across (Un)Popular Culture (London: Verso Books, 1996), and The Most Typical Avant-Garde: History and Geography of Minor Cinemas in Los Angeles (University of California Press, 2006), and articles and reviews in PMLA, October, Social Text, Representations, Film Quarterly, the Minnesota Review, Grey Room, Art Forum, and other journals and periodicals. He also edited To Free the Cinema:  Jonas Mekas and the New York Underground (Princeton University Press, 1992), The Hidden Foundation: Cinema and the Question of Class (Minnesota University Press, 1996), Im Kwon-Taek: The Making Of a Korean National Cinema (Wayne State University Press, 2002), The Sons and Daughters of Los:Culture and Community in LA (Temple University Press, 2003), Stan Brakhage: Filmmaker (Temple University Press, 2006), and Optic Antics: The Cinema of Ken Jacobs (Oxford University Press, 2011),  and has served on the editorial boards of Cinema Journal, Quarterly Review of Film and Video, Now Time, and Art Week. He has also published two books of poetry, and his films have screened at the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Los Angeles Filmforum and Canyon Cinema in San Francisco. His teaching and research interests currently focus on avant-garde cinema, culture in Los Angeles, East-Asian cinema, film and music, and working-class culture.

About First Forum 2017, "Con+tagion"

This year's First Forum, the USC Cinema and Media Studies Graduate Student Conference, will explore the multiple valences of the term ‘contagion’ in relation to the movements of cinema and media. Embedded in medicalized discourses of the body, the word has often been negatively associated with the spread of disease and illness. Even as theories of globalization imagine the uninterrupted flow of information and commodities, the fear of contagion calls for the containment of populations and territories. The Ebola virus, the terrorist, the computer bug, and the zombie alike threaten to breach the boundaries of the body and the nation. Derived from the Latin con (together with) and tangere (to touch), the word ‘contagion’ also implies a proximity of sentiments and sensations. While it may be connected to the risk of contamination and danger, the term might also open up a zone of empathetic contact. Taking its etymological potential as a starting point, this conference invites papers that consider the broad implications of the term. Can ‘contagion’ be a productive model for thinking about the movement and organization of ideas, cultures, and peoples? How can contagious border crossings queer seemingly stable categories of identity, revealing the artificial and arbitrary nature of their construction? What impact do existing representations of contagion—whether of affect, disease, or environmental agents—have on our cultural imaginaries? Can cinema be considered a contagious medium that invites bodily and sensory engagement rather than relying on the distant gaze? How are the material dimensions of this contagious transmission reconfigured through the networks of digital circulation?

In addition to panel presentations, we will have alumni respondents, a faculty roundtable, and a keynote address from Dr. Bliss Cua Lim.

For more information on the First Forum Conference, please visit https://uscfirstforum17.wordpress.com/ or follow the Facebook event page.

About Ism, Ism, Ism

This screening is part of Los Angeles Filmforum’s screening series Ism, Ism, Ism: Experimental Cinema in Latin America (Ismo, Ismo, Ismo: Cine experimental en América Latina). Ism, Ism, Ism is an unprecedented, five-month film series—the first in the U.S.—that surveys Latin America’s vibrant experimental production from the 1930s through today. Revisiting classic titles and introducing recent works by key figures and emerging artists, Ism, Ism, Ism takes viewers on a journey through a wealth of materials culled from unexpected corners of Latin American film archives. Key historical and contemporary works from Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, México, Paraguay, Perú, Uruguay, Venezuela, Puerto Rico and the United States will be featured. Many of the works in the series are largely unknown in the UnitedStates and most screenings will include national and area premieres, with many including Q&A discussions with filmmakers and scholars following the screening. The film series will continue through January 2018 at multiple venues, organized by Filmforum. Visit ismismism.org/calendar/ for a list of upcoming programs.

Ism, Ism, Ism is accompanied by a bilingual publication, Ism, Ism, Ism / Ismo, Ismo, Ismo: Experimental Cinema in Latin America (Jesse Lerner and Luciano Piazza, editors, University of California Press, 2017) placing Latino and Latin American experimental cinema within a broader dialogue that explores different periods, cultural contexts, image-making models, and considerations of these filmmakers within international cinema. Available worldwide, https://www.ucpress.edu/book.php?isbn=9780520296084.

Ism, Ism, Ism is part of Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, a far-reaching and ambitious exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles. Explore more at www.ismismism.orglafilmforum.org, and www.pacificstandardtime.org.

Lead support for Ism, Ism, Ism is provided through grants from the Getty Foundation.

Significant additional support comes from the Andy Warhol Foundation for Visual Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts.

Pacific Standard Time is an initiative of the Getty. The presenting sponsor is Bank of America.

About ZdC

As the graduate student organization for the Bryan Singer Division of Cinema & Media Studies, the School of Cinematic Arts’ largest division, ZdC primarily aims to sponsor professional development and interaction. The organization's goal is to promote social interaction among Cinema & Media Studies graduate students and make it a little easier to understand the current scholarship being conducted at the School of Cinematic Arts. The Division currently host over 30 doctoral candidates along with the 35 students comprising the Master’s program, and its scholars represent a diverse range of topics and interests.

Visit the official ZdC website: http://www.zdcusc.org
Follow ZdC on Facebook @ZdCUSC and on Twitter @ZdC_CMSGA

Check-In & Reservations

This screening is free of charge and open to the public. Please bring a valid USC ID or proof of your reservation confirmation, which will automatically be sent to your e-mail account upon successfully making an RSVP through this website. Doors will open at 3:30 P.M.

All SCA screenings are OVERBOOKED to ensure seating capacity in the theater, therefore seating is NOT GUARANTEED based on RSVPs. The RSVP list will be checked in on a first-come, first-served basis until the theater is full. Once the theater has reached capacity, we will no longer be able to admit guests, regardless of RSVP status.

Parking

The USC School of Cinematic Arts is located at 900 W. 34th St., Los Angeles, CA 90007. Parking passes may be purchased for $12.00 at the McClintock Avenue Entrance (formerly Gate #5) or Royal Street Entrance (formerly Gate #4) on W. Jefferson Blvd. We recommend parking in the Royal Street Parking Structure (formerly PSD), at the far end of 34th Street. Metered street parking is also available along Jefferson Blvd, with limited non-metered spaces also available north of Jefferson and throughout the surrounding neighborhood. Especially if you plan to utilize street parking, we HIGHLY recommend arriving at least 30 minutes before the screening, as parking can be difficult to find and it may take time to walk to the theater from your parking space.

For a map of campus, visit: https://web-app.usc.edu/maps/map.pdf

Contact Information

Name: Debjani Dutta
Email: debjanid@usc.edu