THE DIVISION OF CINEMA & MEDIA STUDIES

cinema.usc.edu/mediastudies
cacham@cinema.usc.edu
213.740.3334
School of Cinematic Arts (SCA) 320

CTCS 190 Introduction to Cinema

"Rated one of the top six USC classes you cannot afford to miss and now fulfilling the General Education requirement, this course explores the formal properties of movies: literary design, performance, visual design, composition (framing/staging/photographing), editing, sound design, genre, style and the production process - that is how movies work and how they should be consumed.  A perennial favorite, #190 fills fast. Screenings include: Singin’ in the Rain, The Talented Mr. Ripley, Sunset Blvd., All About Eve, A Simple Plan, A Place in the Sun, Two for the Road, Some Like it Hot, Election, Witness for the Prosecution, Strangers on a Train, Chinatown, L.A. Confidential, and Inside Man. Screening in 35mm film and/or DCP. 

Open to all majors. This course fulfills the general education requirement. You must also register for a discussion section.

Professor: Drew Casper

CTCS 191 Introduction to TV/Video

Will streaming replace cable TV?  How is social media promoting and profiting from television publicity?  Has the quality of premium cable outpaced feature films? Are women auteurs in television the next big thing?  What are the business models and potentialities of Broadcast, Cable, Premium Cable, SVOD and AVOD?

To discuss these questions, this course introduces students to the study of television as a unique dramatic form with a history of business and creative practices that both overlap and diverge from that of feature film. Emphasis will be placed on the genres of crime, comedy and coming-of-age. Screenings will include: Broad City, Will and Grace, I Love Lucy, The Night Of, Law and Order SVU, Happy Valley, Freak and Geeks, My So-Called Life, OJ Made in America, High Maintenance and East Los High.

Open to all majors. You must also register for a discussion section.

Professor: Aniko Imre

CTCS 192 Race, Class, and Gender in American Film

Named one of the "Top Ten" classes at USC, CTCS 192 analyzes issues of representation within American cinema. Specifically this course will focus on how images and themes of race, class, and gender, as represented in Hollywood film, influence the overall understanding of cultural identity in society at large, both historically and in a contemporary sense as well. Screenings include; Django Unchained (2012), O.J.: Made in America (2016), Selma (2014), The Help (2011), Do the Right Thing (1989), and Rocky (1976), among other titles. 

This course satisfies the university’s diversity requirement and new GE Arts requirement.

Professor: Todd E. Boyd

CTCS 417 African American Television

Named one of the "Top Ten" classes at USC, CTCS 192 analyzes issues of representation within American cinema. Specifically this course will focus on how images and themes of race, class, and gender, as represented in Hollywood film, influence the overall understanding of cultural identity in society at large, both historically and in a contemporary sense as well. Screenings include; Django Unchained (2012), O.J.: Made in America (2016), Selma (2014), The Help (2011), Do the Right Thing (1989), and Rocky (1976), among other titles. 

This course satisfies the university’s diversity requirement and new GE Arts requirement.

Professor: Christine Acham

CTCS 464 Sci-Fi, Horror and Fantasy

An experience of things that go bump in the night; that make our throats dry, our palms clammy, while sending shivers up and down our spines. Screenings include: Cat People, The Exorcist, The Shining, 2001: A Space Odyssey, The Innocents, King Kong, A Trip to the Moon, The Poseidon Adventure, The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, Stir of Echoes, Dead Ringers, Ex_Machina, Let the Right One In, Night of the Living Dead, Halloween, Wolf, Bride of Frankenstein, Freaks, The Day the Earth Stood Still, and The Thing. 

Professor: Drew Casper

CTCS 464 The Rock’ N’ Roll Musical

A survey of the films bout Rock 'n' Roll and adjacent music in the US and the UK. We will trace the Rock’ N’ Roll Musical break from -- but also relation with-- the Classic Hollywood Musical, the new musical and social qualities of rock 'n' roll, and the discovery of ways in which these could be filmicly expressed.  The first part of the course will be specifically concerned with the period from 1955-1975.

This course is a survey of the Rock 'n' Roll Musical in the US and the UK. We will explore the new musical and social qualities of rock 'n' roll, and the discovery of ways in which these could be cinematically represented and elaborated. We will trace the Rock 'n' Roll film’s break from the Classic Hollywood Musical, but also explore the survival and reconstruction of the conventions and motifs of the earlier genre. The first part of the course will be specifically concerned with the period from 1955-1975(e.g. Rock Around the Clock, King Creole, A Hard Day’s Night, Woodstock, Gimme Shelter, Superfly, Nashville, Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, and the second with films about later forms of the music-- in this case, heavy metal and punk -- ending with two or three more recent musical films, especially those that have been important in your lives and chosen by the members of the class.

Professor: David James

CTCS-466: Theatrical Film Symposium
Section: 18125R - Does not require D-Clearance

Theatrical Film Symposium, taught by world-renowned film critic Leonard Maltin, brings you face-to-face with leading film directors, writers, producers, and actors working today. Each week, students watch sneak previews of upcoming movies, followed by exclusive Q&As with the creative teams behind the films. 2017 screenings included Coco, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, Colossal, Life, Land of Mine, Kingsman: The Golden Circle, The Shape of Water, American Made, and Thor: Ragnarok. Recent guests include Damien Chazelle, Adam Scott, Scott Derrickson, Taika Waititi, Lee Unkrich, JJ Abrams, James Franco, Jeff Nichols, Sylvester Stallone, Ryan Coogler, Bryan Cranston, Patricia Riggen, Charlie Kaufman, Atom Egoyan, Kevin Feige, and Judd Apatow.

CTCS-467: Television Symposium
Section: 18126R - Does not require D-Clearance

Taught by Mary McNamara, Pulitzer-prize winning TV Critic and Cultural Editor for the LA Times. Each week, students meet with current TV showrunners for Q&As about writing and producing their shows. Recent guests include: Cheo Coker (Marvel's Luke Cage), Ilene Chaiken (Empire), Noah Hawley (Fargo), Conan O'Brien (Conan), David Simon (The Wire, Show Me a Hero), David Benioff & DB Weiss (Game of Thrones), Dan Goor (Brooklyn Nine-Nine), Bridget Carpenter (11.22.63), Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski (The People vs OJ Simpson), Melissa Rosenberg (Jessica Jones), Matthew Weiner, Erin Levy, Vincent Kartheiser & Elizabeth Moss (Mad Men), Ted Sarandos (Netflix), Kenya Barris (black-ish), and Julie Plec (The Vampire Diaries).

CTCS 469 Hip Hop Culture

This course will study the history of hip hop culture and the representation of this culture in cinema, television, and other forms of media. Specifically, the course will focus on the birth of hip hop in late 1970s New York, the controversial emergence of West Coast hip hop in the late 1980s, the dawn of hip hop’s “Golden Age,” and its massive global expansion through the late 1990s and beyond. The course concludes with a look at hip hop’s role in the election of Barack Obama, the nation’s first African American President. This course is taught by Dr. Todd Boyd, a.k.a. “Notorious Ph.D.” one of the innovative professors who created the academic study of hip hop culture. The class will encompasses film, music, sports, art, fashion, and politics, among other topics.  Screenings to include; Wild Style (1982), Yo, MTV Raps (1988-1995), La Haine(1995), Ghost Dog (1999), Training Day (2001), Biggie and Tupac (2002), Spring Breakers (2014), and Straight Outta Compton (2015), among other titles.

Professor: Todd E. Boyd

CTCS 469 Disney

This course covers the history of the Walt Disney Company from artisanal origins to today. Early animation, popular modernism, mid-century television, development of the theme parks and nature films, the Disney princess, the animation renaissance, and the current portfolio of brands incl. Pixar, Marvel, and LucasFilm. Themes include animation’s relation to the fantastic, the interplay of art and technology, the company’s ecological imaginary, and its role in successive waves of cultural globalization.

Professor: J.D. Connor